My Genealogy

My Early LDS Ancestry

Joseph Lazarus Matthews {My Early LDS PIONEER ANCESTOR}


Descendants of Ralph Matthews

____________________________________

=={My Direct Connection to Joseph Lazarus Matthews}==

[1] Ralph Matthews

[2] Hugh Matthews

[3] Benjamin Matthews              ={sons of Hugh}=         [3] Joseph Matthews

[4] Benjamin Matthews                                                   [4] Jacob Matthews

[5] Allen Matthews                                                         [5] Lazarus Andille Matthews

[6] Harmon P. Matthews                                                 [6] Joseph Lazarus Matthews

[7] Arthur Franklin Matthews

[8] George Harmon Matthews

[9] Arthur Wiley Matthews

[10] Dwight Henry Matthews

[11] Edward Benjamin Matthews "me"

================================================================

Descendants of Jacob Matthews
Generation No. 1
1. JACOB3 MATTHEWS (JOSEPH2, HUGH1) was born Bet. 1735 - 1740, and died Aft. Feb
1810. He married MEADY JOHNSTON. She died Aft. 1820.
Children of JACOB MATTHEWS and MEADY JOHNSTON are:
2. i. JACOB4 MATTHEWS, b. Abt. 1768; d. Aft. 1850.
3. ii. ELIZABETH MATTHEWS, b. Abt. 1770; d. 1848.
4. iii. LAZARUS MATTHEWS.
Generation No. 2
2. JACOB4 MATTHEWS (JACOB3, JOSEPH2, HUGH1) was born Abt. 1768, and died Aft. 1850.
He married DORCAS JOHNSON. She was born Abt. 1772, and died Aft. 1850.
Children of JACOB MATTHEWS and DORCAS JOHNSON are:
5. i. BENJAMIN5 MATTHEWS, b. Abt. 1794.
6. ii. ZADA MATTHEWS, b. 1796; d. 1880, Johnston County, North Carolina.
7. iii. CANDICE MATTHEWS, b. Abt. 1799.
3. ELIZABETH4 MATTHEWS (JACOB3, JOSEPH2, HUGH1) was born Abt. 1770, and died 1848.
She married JOSEPH STEWART, son of CHARLES STEWART and HANNAH KIRK. He was born
Bet. 1760 - 1765, and died Bef. 04 Sep 1820.
Children of ELIZABETH MATTHEWS and JOSEPH STEWART are:
8. i. WILLIAM5 STEWART, b. 20 Apr 1788; d. Aft. 1870.
9. ii. CHARLES STEWART, b. May 1796; d. Bef. 02 Sep 1844.
10. iii. JACOB STEWART, b. 22 Sep 1797; d. 28 Feb 1855.
11. iv. ELIZABETH STEWART.
4. LAZARUS4 MATTHEWS (JACOB3, JOSEPH2, HUGH1) He married DELIA HOWARD.
Children of LAZARUS MATTHEWS and DELIA HOWARD are:
i. JOSEPH5 MATTHEWS, b. 27 Jan 1809; d. 14 May 1886; m. RHODA CARROLL;
b. 16 Mar 1818; d. 12 May 1896.
More About JOSEPH MATTHEWS:
Burial: Glenbar Cemetery, Graham County, Arizona
Notes for RHODA CARROLL:
From James Mark Valsame:
Her name was Rhoda Carrell (b. March 16, 1818, d. May 12, 1896). She was
the first of three wives of Joseph Matthews (b. January 27, 1809, d. May 14,
1886), son of Lazarus Matthews and Delia Howard. Lazarus was the son of
Jacob Matthews and Meady Johnston. Joseph and Rhoda settled in Noxubee
County, Mississippi, and became converts to the LDS (Mormon) Church.
They migrated to the Mormon settlement in Nauvoo, Illinois, and later went
west with Brigham Young's party to the Salt Lake valley in Utah. Joseph
Matthews was one of the original scouts who
explored the valley with Young's party. As was the Mormon custom in the
19th
century, Joseph Matthews had two other wives in addition to Rhoda. Joseph
and
his family settled in Matthewsville (now Glenbar), Arizona. Rhoda is buried
in
Pima Cemetery, Graham County, Arizona. Joseph Matthews is buried in
Glenbar
Cemetery, Graham County, AZ.


================================================================

https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/pioneerDetail?
lang=eng&pioneerId=428

http://records.ancestry.com/joseph_lazarus_matthews_
records.ashx?pid=17665511

http://www.ourfamiliesroots.org/pioneers/company/03.htm

Joseph Lazarus Matthews
Captain of 10 Companies
d.o.b 29 January 1809
d.o.d. 14 May 1886
Brigham Young Pioneer Company (1847)

Sources:
[1]"A Veteran and Patriarch," Deseret News [Weekly],
2 June 1886, 317.
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[2]Atwood, Millen, Journal 1847 Apr.-July.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[3]Brown, John, Reminiscences and journals,
vol. 1, 56-70.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[4]Bullock, Thomas, Journals 1843-1849, vol. 4.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[5]Clayton, William, Diary, 1847 Jan-Dec.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[6]
Egan, Howard, Pioneering the West, 1846 to 1878, ed.
and comp. William M. Egan [1917] 21-105.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[7]Harmon, Appleton Milo, Diary 1847 April-July.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[8]Jacob, Norton, Reminiscence and journal 1844
May-1852 Jan., 47-85.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[9]Kimball, Heber C., Journal, in Papers 1837-1866.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[10]Lyman, Amasa Mason, Diary, reel 1, vol. 8,
1-26 and 1-10, written by Albert Carrington, in Amasa
Mason Lyman, Collection 1832-1877.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[11]Rockwood, Albert Perry, Diary, 1847 Apr.-July.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[12]Snow, Erastus, Journal 1835-1851; 1856-1857,
vol. 4, 3-91.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
[13]Woodruff, Wilford, Journal, 1847 Jan.-1853 Dec., box 2, fd. 3, in Journals and papers 1828-1898.
Trail Excerpt
Source Location
•Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah

========================================================

Joseph Lazarus MATTHEWS

29 Jan 1809 - 14 May 1886

BIRTH: 29 Jan 1809, , Johnston, North Carolina

DEATH: 14 May 1886, Matthewsville, Graham, Arizona

BURIAL: 16 May 1886, Matthewsville, Graham, Arizona

Father: Lazarus Andille MATTHEWS
Mother: Dillia HOWARD

Family 1 : Rhoda CARROLL

MARRIAGE: 14 Jul 1832, , Johnston, North Carolina

Mahalia Ann Rebecca MATTHEWS

+Julia Antonette MATHEWS

Ann Holten MATTHEWS

Anson MATHEWS

Family 2 : Polly BOSS

MARRIAGE: 22 Feb 1848, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa

Joseph Lazarus MATTHEWS

David Henry MATTHEWS

Solomon Franklin MATTHEWS

Ella Olive MATTHEWS

William T MATTHEWS

Rhoda Jane MATTHEWS

John Daniel MATTHEWS

Charles Amasa MATTHEWS

Polly Ann MATTHEWS

Family 3 : Martha Jane POTTER

MARRIAGE: 22 Jul 1865, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Polly Ann MATTHEWS

Simon Carroll MATTHEWS

Jacob Eugene MATTHEWS

_Jacob MATTHEWS _____+

| (1738 - ....) m 1763

_Lazarus Andille MATTHEWS _|

| (1776 - 1866) m 1800 |

| |_Middy JOHNSTON _____

 

| (1742 - ....) m 1763

|

|--Joseph Lazarus MATTHEWS

| (1809 - 1886)

| _ HOWARD ____________

| | (1756 - 1787) m 1781

|_Dillia HOWARD ____________|

(1786 - 1866) m 1800 |

|_Mary _______________


(1760 - ....) m 1781


Joseph Lazarus Matthews was born on January 29, 1809 in Johnson County, North Carolina. He is found on the 1810 U.S. Census for Johnston County, North Carolina, with his father, Lazarus. [Page 274. Film #0337913. Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street; Salt Lake City, Utah 84150.] He is also on the 1820 U.S. Census for Johnston County, North Carolina, with his father, Lazarus. [Page 261. Film #162796. Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street; Salt Lake City, Utah 84150.] The 1830 U.S. Census for Johnston County, North Carolina, again shows a son Joseph's age with his father, Lazarus. [Page 109].
In July 1832, he married Rhoda Carroll, also of Johnston County. Sometime before 1833, they moved to Mississippi, where their daughter Mahalia Ann Rebecca Matthews was born. On the 1840 U.S. Census for Noxubee County, Mississippi, he is listed. Also on the 1845 Mississippi State Census for Noxubee County. [David Hincs on top of page (no page number). Film #899,869. Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street; Salt Lake City, Utah 84150.]

While in Mississippi, Joseph and Rhoda learned of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He and Rhoda joined the church in May 1844. He traded his plantation in Mississippi for a place in Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo in early 1845. In January 1846, Joseph and Rhoda were sealed in the Nauvoo Temple. Soon they were driven from their home and forced to cross the west bank of the Mississippi River. There they camped in wagon boxes and tents. It was during the winter. A call came for 500 men to fight against Mexico. Joseph L was among the first to volunteer. President Brigham Young was selecting those to join and he told Joseph L that he had other work for him to do.

Joseph L. Matthews was one of the 140 men who were selected to find a home in the west. He was one of the party of scouts sent ahead to look for suitable camps. Joseph was one who was very frank and outspolen and did not go along with something he knew was not right. Two amusing accounts exist about Joseph. One day when they were camped, President Young took a pair of field glasses and looked at the side of a nearby mountain. He then handed the glasses to one of the head men and said, "Do you see the antelope over there?" The man looked and said he could see the antelope. After the glasses had been handed to all the men and they all had confessed to seeing the antelope, President Young called Joseph L. over to the group and said, "See the antelope over there?" Joseph L. looked and then handed the glasses back to President Young, "No, I don't see any antelope and neither did you see any for there aren't any antelope over there to see." President Young then said, "There is your answer; I never said there were any antelope, I merely said See the antelope? But Brother Matthews has to see a thng. He would not see the antelope just to please me, and I find his reports are always on what he sees. If he does not see a thing, it is not there." Also he added, "I have found his judgment very good."

It was a custom of the people crossing the plains to drive their wagons in a circle when making camp. This served as a place to hold the stock during the night. Two of the wagons would be placed so as to act as a set of bars or a gate. Such an arrangement served as a fort against enemy attack as well. One man of the party always acted as camp boss. One evening when it was Joseph L. Matthew's turn to be camp boss, they had made camp early. President Young would ride around to make sure all was well. Upon leaving, President Young left the bars down and started to ride away. Joseph L being an outspoken man called to President Young that he had left the bars down. President Young rode back, dismounted and put up the bars. One of the company said, "Brother Matthews, you should not have asked President Young to do that." President Young overheard the remark and said, "Just why not? Why should I be permitted to break the rules of the camp? I just wanted to see what Brother Matthews would do. I should be the last one to break the rules."

After many weeks of travel, they reached a point near the Salt Lake Valley, being one of the first to see the valley. There was great haste on the part of those who had been left behind to follow the first men down to the valley. President Young was riding in the back of a wagon and when they reached a point where they had a good view of the valley below them, Brigham Young rose up and said, "Yes, this is the place." A monument was erected on that spot. Joseph Lazarus Matthews is listed on the "This is the Place" Monument in Salt Lake City.

Joseph L Matthews lived in Salt Lake City when he married Polly Boss in 1848. She was known as Aunt Polly. she was always on the go among the sick. she was a gifted nurse and knew the uses of herbs. There were nine children born to this marriage. 1850
1860 U.S. Census for Santaquin, Utah County, Utah. p. 263. Film #0805314. Ogden Family History Center, 539 24th Street; Ogden, Utah.
1870 U.S. Census for Santaquin, Utah County, Utah. p. 6 line 24. Film #0553111. Ogden Family History Center, 539 24th Street; Ogden, Utah.
1880 Family is in Santaquin. Census Place: Santaquin, Utah, Utah
Source: FHL Film 1255338 National Archives Film T9-1338 Page 236B
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
John D. HOLLADAY Self M M W 27 CA
Occ: Butcher Fa: MS Mo: AL

JOHN DANIEL HOLLADAY, married Katherine Beeseley HIGGINS and moved to Marion County Alabama, where they reared 10 children. He owned
a large plantation, had a number of slaves, and grew corn, cotton, and tobacco.
He embraced the gospel, sold his plantation, freed his slaves and moved his. family to Utah. The winter of 1846-47 they spent at Pueblo, COLORADO. They came as far as Laramie, WYOMING a year AHEAD of the UTAH PIONEERS, went down to Colorado. They joined a company known as the MISSISSIPPI SAINTS, and retraced their steps to the NORTHERN TRAIL (Laramie?) in the spring of 1847, and followed the original band of Pioneers into the Salt Lake Valley the latter part of July. JOHN DANIEL HOLLADAY and KATHERINE BEESELY HIGGINS were sealed in the ENDOWMENT HOUSE by Brigham Young in April 1851.
On Helen Ivy HOLLADAY'S lines----we have an illustrious ancestor
JOSEPH LAZARUS MATTHEWS. He was a SCOUT for Brigham Young, along with Porter Rockwell. He is on the MORMON MONUMENT, "This is the Place" in
east Salt Lake. Joseph Lazarus Matthews was in charge of the 14th GROUP for Brigham Young.
Just briefly will mention 3 stories that are told about him concerning Brigham Young. They are:
Antelope through field glasses
Leaving barricade down on a circle encampment ? Living the United Order
His wife was Rhoda CARROLL --- and she was called "Fat Grandma", and everyone loved her. Joseph Lazarus also had a couple bursts of temper passed down about him but he had SPUNK,to scythe least, and he was VERY TRUSTED by Brigham Young. He was sent to colonize in Southern Utah, in San Bernadine Calif, and lastly at 70 years was sent to Arizona where he helped colonize in the Gila Valley.. Matthewsville (just west of Pima) was named for him. He died not long afterwards.
We have MORE COMPLETE histories of these people, but time being short, we decided to just give you a smattering of your heritage in the wide open spaces of the ARIZONA TERRITORY. We have much to be proud of...on both the McEuen and Holladay lines. They were courageous, brave people, with the necessary abilities and talents to FORGE AHEAD into the wilderness with the HARDEST type of work, and NOT ONLY SURVIVE, but to flourish ....
Rebeca F. HOLLADAY Wife F M W 25 PA
Occ: Keeping House Fa: ENGL Mo: ENGL
Mahalia HOLLADAY Dau F S W 6 UT
Fa: --- Mo: ---
David F. HOLLADAY Son M S W 3 UT
Fa: --- Mo: ---
Inga HOLLADAY Dau F S W 2 UT
Fa: --- Mo: ---
William HOLLADAY Son M S W 3M UT
Fa: --- Mo: ---
Rhoda MATHEWS GMother F M W 65 NC
Fa: NC Mo: NC
Census Place: Spingerville Village, Apache, Arizona
Source: FHL Film 1254036 National Archives Film T9-0036 Page 16B
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Jos. MATHEWS Self M M W 71 IL
Occ: Farmer Fa: UNKNOWN Mo: UNKNOWN
Martha MATHEWS Wife F M W 27 IA
Fa: IA Mo: IA
Simon MATHEWS Son M S W 12 UT
Fa: IL Mo: IA
Daniel MATHEWS Son M S W 19 UT
Occ: Farmer Fa: IL Mo: IA

He is also listed on The Founder's Monument in San Bernardino.
Matthews, Joseph, one of the original pioneers of Utah, was born Jan. 29, 1809, in
Johnson County, North Carolina. He embraced the gospel in the fall of 1843, and
moved to Nauvoo, Ill., where he worked on the Temple and filled several missions to
the Eastern States. He became an exile from Nauvoo in 1846, and while encamped at
Winter Quarters, was chosen as one of Pres. Brigham Young's company of pioneers.
He was also one of Orson Pratt's advance company which entered Great Salt Lake
Valley ahead of the main company of pioneers. He was a member of Parley P. Pratt's
exploration party in southern Utah in 1849. In 1851 he was called to California with
Charles C. Rich and Amasa M. Lyman and remained in San Bernardino until that
settlement was abandoned in 1857. In 1869 and 1870 he filled a mission to the Southern
States and in 1880 moved to Arizona. He died at Pima, Graham Co., Arizona, May 14,
1886.

================================================================

July 22, 1847
The first wagons moved downstream toward the mouth of Emigration Canyon. Since the route over Donner Hill was too rough, the Mormons spent four hours cutting a mile-and-a-half of new road around the north end of Donner Hill to rejoin the Donner tracks on the high ground south of present Hogle Zoo. Shortly after noon, they followed the Donner tracks on the south bank of Emigration Creek in a southwesterly direction into the valley. After the creek took a turn to the north the group continued west to a campsite in the vicinity of present-day 500 East between 1700 and 2100 South. They camped on the north bank of Parley's Creek that night. Thomas Bullock noted in his journal:

"...when we turned round the hill to the right-& came in full view of the Salt Lake in the distance, with its bold hills on its Islands towering up in bold relief behind the Silvery Lake- a very extensive valley burst upon our view, dotted in 3 or 4 places with Timber- I should expect the valley to be about 30 miles long & 20 miles wide-I could not help shouting "hurra, hurra, hurra, theres my home at last"-the Sky is very clear, the air delightful & all together looks glorious; the only drawback appearing to be the absence of timber- but there is an Ocean of Stone in the Mountains, to build Stone houses, & Walls for fencing- if we can only find a bed of Coal we can do well, & be hidden up in the Mountains unto the Lord- we descended a gentle sloping table land to a lower level where the Soil & grass improve in appearance- as we progressed down the Valley, small Clumps of dwarf Oak, & Willow appear, the Wheat Grass grows 6 or 7 feet high, many different kinds of grass appear, some being 10 or 12 feet high- after wading thro' thick grass for some distance, we found a place bare enough for a Camping ground, the grass being only knee deep, but very thick; we camped on the banks of a beautiful little stream which was surrounded by very tall grass." (Thomas Bullock, Thursday, July 22, 1847, LDS Church Archives)

Also on this day, Orson Pratt and eight others conducted an extensive survey of the area to determine the best location for planting crops. A site about two miles north of this campsite was chosen. From William Clayton's journal:

"Agreeable to President Young's instructions, Elder Pratt, accompanied by George A. Smith, John Brown, Joseph Mathews, John Pack, Orrin Porter Rockwell, and J. C. Little started on this morning on horses to seek out a suitable place to plant some potatoes, turnips, etc., so as to preserve the seed at least...There is an extensive, beautiful, level looking valley from here to the lake which I should judge from the numerous deep green patches must be fertile and rich...The intervening valley appears to be well supplied with streams, creeks and lakes, some of the latter are evidently salt...There is but little timber in sight anywhere and that is mostly on the banks of creeks and streams of water which is about the only objection which could be raised in my estimation to this being one of the most beautiful valleys and pleasant places for a home for the Saints which could be found...The land looks dry and lacks rain, but the numerous creeks and springs must necessarily tend to moisten it much." (William Clayton Journal, July 22, 1847, LDS Church Archives)

July 23, 1847
On this morning, the group backtracked about a mile to avoid the very tall grass and marshy areas where Parley's, Emigration, and Red Butte Creeks converged. Then Pratt guided the wagons north from about 11th East and 17th South through present Liberty Park ending between 3rd and 4th South and between Main and State Street to an area on the east bank of the south branch of City Creek. Plowing was begun at once and that evening Pratt dedicated the land as a place for the future home of the saints. William Clayton stated:

"The brethren immediately rigged three plows and went to plowing a little northeast of the camp; another party went with spades, etc., to make a dam on one of the creeks so as to throw the water at pleasure on the field, designing to irrigate the land in case rain should not come sufficiently." (William Clayton Journal, July 23, 1847, LDS Church Archives)

July 24, 1847
This is the day which Brigham Young arrived in the valley. When he "emerged from the mouth of Emigration Canyon he lifted himself up in his bed and peered out of his wagon which overlooked the valley, the cottonwoods on the creek and the camp on the east side of the creek in fair view", President Young said "that this was the place he had seen long since in vision; it was here he had seen the tent settling down from heaven and resting, and a voice said unto him, Here is the place where my people Israel shall pitch their tents." (Erastus Snow discourse delivered July 25, 1880) The location where he made his famous statement was not determined until 1915. At that time a group including George Albert Smith, B.H. Roberts, and Andrew Jenson placed a temporary marker in the spot where This is the Place Monument now stands. There was much rejoicing in the group when Brigham Young first arrived.

Trails After July 24, 1847
On July 26, nine men were chosen to accompany Brigham Young and explore such places as the warm springs (present-day location of Wasatch Plunge) and Ensign Peak.

On July 27, Amasa M. Lyman, Sam Brannan, Rodney Badger, and Roswell Stevens arrived into the valley on horseback and probably made their own trail to the camp on City Creek.

On July 29, a large group of the Mormon Battalion entered the valley. They apparently turned north at the canyon mouth, then headed west, crossing Red Butte Creek and leaving the bench near what is now 9th South and 13th East. From there the trail turned northwest to the camp on City Creek.

Later the main immigration route into the city from Emigration Canyon shifted north to the head of 3rd South which became known as Emigration Street.

================================================================

A few local men were clustered outside a shop in a frontier town in Arizona. They were discussing their land and how difficult some of it was to farm.
"I've a large plot that's particularly hard to manage," one said. "If someone would work it for me, I'd give them a quarter of it."
He was overheard by Frederico Sanchez, a hard-working immigrant from Mexico that the locals called Mexican Fred. Frederico approached the group and said that he would take those terms, if the man were serious. They reached an agreement, and Frederico began the rough work of moving rocks, irrigating, and cultivating the land. It took several seasons for the land to become profitably productive, but Frederico was determined and did his job well. At the end of the term he approached the landowner to collect the title for the portion of the land promised to him. Now that the land was tamed the man was reluctant to part with the quarter. It was significantly more than what others paid over for the same services where the ground was not so hard. He hedged on the original agreement and offered a smaller amount of land instead. Frederico was not about to accept anything less than what was offered him originally. He didn't have the agreement in writing, but many men had overheard the verbal contract.
"We should discuss it with the bishop," offered the landowner. He was a high priest in the church and was reasonably sure the bishop would decide in his favor. What he offered was fair, even if it wasn't what he'd originally agreed to.
Frederico wasn't a member of the church, so he hesitated. "Who is the bishop?" he asked.
"Daniel Matthews," the man replied.
Frederico knew him. He was a fair man. "If he isa your bishop, then heesa my bishop too!" Frederico exclaimed in thickly accented English. The two went to Daniel Matthews, the grandson of Joseph Matthews from earlier posts. He listened to them both and talked to some others who had been there at the time the agreement was made. Much to the landowners surprise, he sided with Mexican Fred.

================================================================

Henry Allen HOWARD

[4299]

1782 - BEF 26 May 1817

BIRTH: 1782, of Wake County, North Carolina [4297]

DEATH: BEF 26 May 1817, , Johnston, North Carolina [4298]

Father: HOWARD
Mother: Mary

Family 1 : Margaret SHAW

 


MARRIAGE: 28 May 1803, , Cumberland, North Carolina

__

|

_ HOWARD ____________|

| (1756 - 1787) m 1781|

| |__

|

|

|--Henry Allen HOWARD


| (1782 - 1817)

| __

| |

|_Mary _______________|

(1760 - ....) m 1781|

|__

 

 

INDEX


[4299] He is listed as the uncle of Joseph Lazarus Matthews in the Record Book of Archibald Sullivan.
Henry Howard, age 5, was apprenticed to Joseph Peoples (Peebles) in 1787. Wake County Court Minutes.
RESIDENCE:
12 February 1803 Henry buys land from Joseph Peebles in Cumberland County, North Carolina. He sells the land back to Joseph in December 1810.
1810 U.S. Census: North Carolina, Cumberland County. Film #337,917. Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street; Salt Lake City, Utah. Four children are counted on the census.
1811-1817 Henry Howard family lives in Johnston County, North Carolina.
CHILDREN: Eight children are counted on the 1820 census with his widow, Margaret.

He is listed as the uncle of Joseph Lazarus Matthews in the Record Book of Archibald Sullivan.
Henry Howard, age 5, was apprenticed to Joseph Peoples (Peebles) in 1787. Wake County Court Minutes.
RESIDENCE:
12 February 1803 Henry buys land from Joseph Peebles in Cumberland County, North Carolina. He sells the land back to Joseph in December 1810.
1810 U.S. Census: North Carolina, Cumberland County. Film #337,917. Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street; Salt Lake City, Utah. Four children are counted on the census.
1811-1817 Henry Howard family lives in Johnston County, North Carolina.
CHILDREN: Eight children are counted on the 1820 census with his widow, Margaret.

================================================================

_John SULLIVAN ___________+

| (1783 - 1869) m 1812

_Archibald SULLIVAN ______|

| (1819 - 1898) m 1850 |

| |_Mary COLQUHOUN __________+

| (1795 - 1870) m 1812

|

|--Joseph John SULLIVAN

 


| (1853 - 1936)

| _Joseph Lazarus MATTHEWS _+

| | (1809 - 1886) m 1832

|_Julia Antonette MATHEWS _|

(1836 - 1913) m 1850 |

|_Rhoda CARROLL ___________+

(1818 - 1896) m 1832

INDEX

 


[678] JOSEPH JOHN SULLIVAN
(1853-1936)

Joseph John Sullivan was born May 2, 1853 in San Bernardino, California. He was the oldest of thirteen children. His father, Archibald Sullivan was born in Cumberland County, North Carolina in 1819. In 1847, hearing of the gold rush in California, he joined a party and came west, traveling across the continent with pack mules, and arrived in Salt Lake City soon after the first company of pioneers. While there he took sick and the party he was with left him and went on. He was doctored by a Brother Joseph Lazarus Mathews who gave him the church works to read. At the end of 1849 he joined the Mormon Church. In November 1850, he married Brother Matthew's daughter, Julia Antoinette, who was born in Mississippi in 1836. She had joined the church when eight years old and came to Utah with the first company.

In 1852 they were called by President Brigham Young to go to San Bernardino, California. A year later their first child, Joseph John was born. They lived in San Bernardino until 1857 when they were called back to Utah.

They settled in Beaver and lived there until 1859. Then they moved to Santaquin where they lived until the spring of 1862, when they were called to help settle Dixie. They started in company with the Maxwell family. Upon reaching the Sevier River they found that the bridge had been washed away and as they could not ford the river they built a raft and on this they got their wagons across and also ferried some wagons that were on their way to California. They stopped at Grafton for a few weeks and then went on to Washington where they spent the winter. John attended school that winter for the first time. His father came to St. George and sunk a well four hundred feet deep on the St. George Public Square, but was unable to get water.

In the spring of 1863 thee family moved to St. George where they made their permanent home. Her Brother John Sullivan attended school until he was sixteen years of age. The schools were not organized as they are now. The parents had to pay the school teacher according to the number of children they had attending. The pupils were not allowed to write their lessons, but they were studied and then given orally. Anyone found drawing pictures received severe punishment.

The Indians were found to be very troublesome neighbors. When the pioneers first came to Dixie the only clothes the Indians wore were made of rabbit skins. They lived on roots, seeds, yant, and small game.

Soon after Brother John's arrival in St. George, as Brother Frank Bentley and a number of other men were coming from Price, they had a little skirmish with some Navajos. The alarm was given in St. George and a posse of men and boys was sent after the Indians. They chased them over the Black Ridge west of town into the Santa Clara fields. Finally the older Indians were captured and brought to town. A treaty was made and an Indian was sent after the younger ones. When they came back a beef was killed, a feast was held, and good feelings were restored.

At another time a little trouble was had with some Indians and they were brought to town. On the way an Indian tried to get Brother George Whitney's gun and during the struggle the Indian was shot through the shoulder. A treat of peace was again made.

When the people were one their way to the muddy valley they camped one night forty miles south of St. George. During the night their stock was stolen by a band of Navajos. A messenger was sent to St. George and a company of men under the leadership of Brother George Gould was sent to capture the Indians. They took a cut off in order to get ahead of the Indians and camped that night at Cane Springs. Soon after midnight the Indians passed, driving the stock towards the Colorado River. Some of the men wanted to go after them but the Captain would not give his consent. At daybreak they started but were too far behind to overtake the Indians before they crossed the river. The mules that were lost were then valued at $500.00 a team.

Soon after this incident President Erastus Snow called a company of men to explore the country and find the places where the Indians crossed the Colorado River. The company was led by Brother James Andrus and brother Coplin. They went to Kanab and then on to Buckskin Mountain. Here it was decided that the company was too large so they sent ten men and the poorest horses for home. Early in the afternoon these men were climbing a narrow path over a steep mountain. Elijah Averett from Washington was leading and just as he reached the top he was shot by an Indian. The other men ran back, except one who hid behind a tree. He watched the Indians gather the horses and then followed them for a short distance to see in which direction they went, then he went back to his companions and told them what he had seen. A few men were sent to bury the body and the others took a cut off, got ahead of the Indians and surprised them just before daybreak. They scattered, leaving the stock behind.

Before the men left home, Brother Snow had said to them. "Brethren, all that are called shall return; no harm shall befall you." The young man who was killed was not called but had been hired to go in another man's place. Brother Sullivan said that there is not one Indian now where there were twenty when he first came to Dixie.

On December 2, 1872, Joseph John Sullivan was married to Mary Ann Worthen. Ten children were born to them. He had been engaged in farming and stock raising since he first came to Dixie. For the last ten to twelve years of his life, he had been troubled with rheumatism, but he enduring the hardships of an early settler's life and his late affliction without complaining. He always looked on the bright side of life and was always ready with a cheerful word for everyone.

The following was taken from The Deseret News, Monday March 30, 1936.

Funeral services for Joseph John Sullivan, 82, were conducted Sunday at 4:00 p.m. in the St. George Tabernacle, with Bishop Harold Snow of the South Ward presiding. Mr. Sullivan died Friday night of infirmities incident to age.

He was born in San Bernardino, California, a son of Archibald and Julia Antoinette Mathews Sullivan, and moved with his parents when a small boy to Payson. In 1864 he came to Dixie and resided here since.

Mr. Sullivan married Mary Ann Worthen, Dec. 2, 1872, in the old Salt Lake Endowment House, and is survived by seven sons and daughters. Sam Sullivan of Murray, Utah, Mrs. Leah Cannon, Mrs. Hettie Bentley, Charles, Clifford, Victor and Gordon Sullivan, all of St. George and the following brothers and sisters; Mrs. Jessie McQuarrie, Compton, Calif., Mrs. Julie Gray, Salt Lake City, and William Sullivan, Leeds. Also surviving are 54 grandchildren and 24 great grandchildren.

========================================================================

JOSEPH LAZARUS MATTHEWS. He was a SCOUT for Brigham Young, along with Porter Rockwell. He is on the MORMON MONUMENT, "This is the Place" in
east Salt Lake. Joseph Lazarus Matthews was in charge of the 14th GROUP for Brigham Young.
Just briefly will mention 3 stories that are told about him concerning Brigham Young. They are:
Antelope through field glasses
Leaving barricade down on a circle encampment ? Living the United Order
His wife was Rhoda CARROLL --- and she was called "Fat Grandma", and everyone loved her. Joseph Lazarus also had a couple bursts of temper passed down about him but he had SPUNK,to scythe least, and he was VERY TRUSTED by Brigham Young. He was sent to colonize in Southern Utah, in San Bernadine Calif, and lastly at 70 years was sent to Arizona where he helped colonize in the Gila Valley.. Matthewsville (just west of Pima) was named for him. He died not long afterwards.
We have MORE COMPLETE histories of these people, but time being short, we decided to just give you a smattering of your heritage in the wide open spaces of the ARIZONA TERRITORY. We have much to be proud of...on both the McEuen and Holladay lines. They were courageous, brave people, with the necessary abilities and talents to FORGE AHEAD into the wilderness with the HARDEST type of work, and NOT ONLY SURVIVE, but to flourish ....

=====================================

Also on this day, Orson Pratt and eight others conducted
an extensive survey of the area to determine the best
location for planting crops. A site about two miles north
of this campsite was chosen. From William Clayton's
journal:
"Agreeable to President Young's instructions, Elder Pratt,
accompanied by George A. Smith, John Brown, Joseph
Lazarus Mathews, John Pack, Orrin Porter Rockwell, and
J. C. Little started on this morning on horses to seek out
a suitable place to plant some potatoes, turnips, etc., so
as to preserve the seed at least...There is an extensive,
beautiful, level looking valley from here to the lake
which I should judge from the numerous deep green
patches must be fertile and rich...The intervening valley
appears to be well supplied with streams, creeks and
lakes, some of the latter are evidently salt...There is but
little timber in sight anywhere and that is mostly on the
banks of creeks and streams of water which is about the
only objection which could be raised in my estimation to
this being one of the most beautiful valleys and pleasant
places for a home for the Saints which could be found...
The land looks dry and lacks rain, but the numerous
creeks and springs must necessarily tend to moisten it
much." (William Clayton Journal, July 22, 1847, LDS
Church Archives)
======================================

Joseph Lazarus Matthews had 3 wives .
[1] Rhoda Carroll marriage date= July 14, 1832
Johnston , N.C.
[2]Polly Boss marriage date= February 22, 1848
Council Bluffs , Iowa
[3]Martha Jane Potter marriage date= July 22, 1865
Salt Lake , Utah

Polly Boss [2nd wife of joseph lazarus matthews]
January 13, 1831 Johnston , N.C.
May 14, 1886 Graham , Az.

Charles Amasa Matthews
2 Aug 1863-20 Dec 1932
Born: Spring Creek, Utah
 Father: Joseph Matthews
 Mother: Polly Boss Matthews
 Wife: Hannah Jorgenson Matthews
 * Ward Clerk for Matthews Ward from 1888 to 1894.
In 1894 he served a mission in Missouri and Louisiana.

Ann Holten Matthews
December 15, 1838 Noxubee , Mississippi
October 12, 1923 Graham , Az.

David Henry Matthews
28 Dec 1851-22 Dec 1919
Born: San Bernardino, California
 Father: Joseph Matthews
 Mother: Polly Boss Matthews
 Wife: Clara Amelia Wall Matthews
 * Bishop of Matthews Ward 1888-1896 and
 Supervisor of Graham County 1897-1901.

Thomas Wiley Middleton Holladay
9-2-1836 marion, alabama
12-10-1921 graham, arizona
=Ann Holten Matthews
12-15-1838 noxubee, ms
10-12-1923 graham, arizona
From the LDS Biographical Encyclopedia: Thomas
Wiley Middleton Holladay, pioneer of 1847 was born
Sept. 2, 1836 in Mosco, Marion Co, Alabama to John
Holladay and Catherine Beesley Higgins. He came with
his parents to Utah in 1847 after wintering with the
so-called Mississippi Saints In Pueblo, Colorado. From
Pueblo he brought in his saddlebags a variety of hard
red winter wheat seed that became the basis of
intermountain wheat culture. He obtained this wheat in
Taos New Mexico and traveled 100 miles to obtain it.
After arrival in the valley father John Holladay planted
this seed on his farm in Cottonwood (Holladay) and
from this crop came the wheat known as Taos hard
winter wheat the universally known wheat of the great
west. Great credit is due the Holladays for introducing
this strain of wheat. He accompanied his parents to San
Bernardino in 1851 and there in January 1856 married
Ann Hotton Matthews. The ceremony was performed by
Apostle Amasa Lyman. They Holladays were sealed in
the Salt Lake Temple in 1861. Their first child, George
Thomas was born in 1857 in San Bernardino. Ann
subsequently bore him ten children. Thomas returned to
Utah in 1858 living a year at Beaver and then settling at
Summit or Santaquin in Utah Co. There he farmed with
his mother on her establishment at Holladay Springs
near Spring Lake. After residing 20 years in Santaquin
the Holladays moved to Arizona territory, first to Forest
Dale in Apache Co. and then to Matthews in Graham
Co, where the father of Ann Holladay ,
Joseph Matthews was living. They were successful
farmers and ran a livery stable for a time as well as doing
contract threshing. Thomas died in 1921 while living
with the family of his son Franklin Hollis Holladay. He
was a large man with dark hair and moustache.

=======================================

July 23, 1847
   First order of business this morning was to move the
pioneer camp near the spot Orson Pratt and Erastus
Snow had selected as a planting field. And while the
routine of eating breakfast and hitching the teams was
under way, John Pack and Joseph Lazarus Mathews
saddled up to ride to Brigham Young's camp with a full
report. From its initial campsite on Parleys Creek near
today's 500 East and 1700 South, the pioneer company
backtracked a mile, then headed north for four miles,
bringing it to about 400 South and State (where the Salt
Lake City-County Building now stands). Pratt reported
the camp was near the bank of a beautiful creek of pure
cold water (City Creek).
William Clayton observed that, "the grass here is even
richer and thicker on the ground than where we left this
morning. The soil looks indeed rich, black and a little
sandy. Grass is about four feet high and thick on the
ground and well mixed with rushes. "If we stay here
three weeks and our teams have any rest they will be in
good order to return," he said.
   Willard Richards took the opportunity to lecture the
pioneers on the importance of getting their potatoes,
turnips and buckwheat into the ground, and cautioned
against greed, selfishness and avarice in regard to sharing
the harvest. Otherwise, he warned, they might meet a fate
similar to the Donner emigrants. The camp then joined
in prayer and asked the Lord to send a little rain. Three
plows were unlimbered and William Carter, George W.
Brown and Shadrach Roundy shared the honor of
running the first furrows plowed by white men in the
valley of the Great Salt Lake, according to Erastus Snow.
   The planting, "a little northeast of the camp," was done
within the two blocks bounded by today's Main and 200
East, and 100 and 200 South. The soil was hard and dry
and plows broke several times during the day. Some of
the men built a dam across the creek to divert water from
the stream to the plowed land. By early afternoon three
plows were working at once along with a harrow and a
drag. Norton Jacob and Lewis Barney had made two
harrows ready to use and by nightfall, three acres of
ground had been broken.
    Thomas Bullock, who had been copying letters to
Brigham Young, enclosed a table of distances and a map
of the route from the Weber River to the valley camp,
for Pack and Mathews to carry. Then Bullock leaned
back to survey his new home. "A hare crossed the road
two wagons ahead of me," he said. "We are camped on
the banks of a beautiful stream [City Creek] covered on
both sides with willows and shrubs. Rich land, deep
grass and the intended location for a farm."
   Fresh sets of teams were ordered to be ready every four
hours during the planting and every pioneer was to plant
his own potatoes and seeds as he pleased, Bullock noted.
Almon S. Williams was in charge of making and firing a
coal pit, while George A. Smith suggested the men
collecting firewood only pick up dead timber, leaving
live timber standing.
   At East Canyon Creek some twenty miles to the east,
Howard Egan and Brigham Young's company began
moving out on a rough and rocky road to traverse Big
Mountain. The descent on the west slope was treacherous
as usual, with most of the wagons going down with rear
wheels locked. Halfway, Lorenzo D. Young's ox-drawn
wagon overturned with his two little boys in it.
Providentially, they escaped injury, though part of the
load had broken loose and fallen on them, at the same
time sealing off the rear. The frightened youngsters were
freed by cutting a hole in the wagon cover.
  Pack and Mathews rode up as the small company
reached Mountain Dell. The wagons made it over Little
Mountain and camped on Last (Emigration) Creek as
Pack and Mathews made their way back to the valley
with word that Brigham Young would join the main
camp tomorrow.

================================================

http://www.carterville.com/genealogy/church/matthews/blessing_JosephLazarusMatthewsSr(10089)-001.pdf

Patriarchal Blessing of Joseph Lazarus Matthews
12 April 1845
Nauvoo, Illinois
A blessing by John Smith upon the head of Joseph Matthews, son of Lazarus Matthews and
Delia Howard, born January 29, 1809, Johnson County, North Carolina.
Brother Joseph, I lay my hands upon thy head in the name of Jesus of Nazareth
and place upon thee a Father's blessing. In as much as thou art of the house of
Ephraim, thou hast a right by inheritance to all the blessings which were sealed
upon his head by his father Jacob and the same priesthood with all it's powers
and benefits. In due time thou shalt have all the keys to unlock the mysteries of
the priesthood, and thou art also called to preach the Gospel to the Lamanites
and whisperings of the spirit one to the Islands of the sea, and thou shalt have
power over winds and waves. Thou shalt go forth as a mighty man and as a
man of war. Thou shalt prevail, thine enemies and no power on earth shall
prevail against thee.
Thou shalt gather thousands of the sons of Jacob and lead them to Zion with
vast stores of earth, and thou shalt bring much yet forth for the building up of
Zion. Thou shalt be satisfied with thy labors, and no good thing shall be
withheld from thee. Thy posterity shall be a numerous and a mighty people. The
number of thy years shall be according to thy faith. Thou shalt see all things
fulfilled which the prophets have spoken concerning the latter-day glory-to be
one of the 144,000 which are spoken of to stand on Mount Zion in the last days.
This is thy blessing which shall not fail if thou art faithful.
I seal it upon thee and thy posterity in common with thy companion forever.

====================================================

JOSEPH LAZARUS MATTHEWS. He was a SCOUT for Brigham Young,
along with Porter Rockwell. He is on the MORMON MONUMENT,
"This is the Place" ineast Salt Lake. Joseph Lazarus
Matthews was in charge of the 14th GROUP for Brigham Young.
Just briefly will mention 3 stories that are told about him
concerning Brigham Young. They are:Antelope through field glasses
Leaving barricade down on a circle encampment & Living the United
Order.
His wife was Rhoda CARROLL --- and she was called "Fat Grandma",
and everyone loved her. Joseph Lazarus also had a couple bursts of
temper passed down about him but he had SPUNK,to scythe least, and
he was VERY TRUSTED by Brigham Young. He was sent to colonize in
Southern Utah, in San Bernadine Calif, and lastly at 70 years was
sent to Arizona where he helped colonize in the Gila Valley..
Matthewsville (just west of Pima) was named for him. He died not
long afterwards.
=============================================================

[Joseph Lazarus Matthews Company]
Departure=Nov. or Dec. 1857
Arrival=Feb. 1858
Number In Company=12
Individuals Known to Have Traveled in This Company:
Name  Age  Birth Date  Death Date 

Bird, Elizabeth 11 1 January 1846 23 March 1943
Matthews, David Henry 6 28 December 1851 22 December 1919
Matthews, Joseph Lazarus 7 11 June 1850 3 December 1904
Matthews, Joseph Lazarus 48 29 January 1809 14 May 1886
Matthews, Polly Boss 46 13 January 1831 20 June 1920
Matthews, Rhoda Carroll 39 16 March 1818 12 May 1896
Matthews, Solomon Franklin 3 27 February 1854 5 May 1898
Stark, Ann Cook 36 4 June 1821 15 May 1865
Stark, Annie Frances 9 19 February 1848 18 June 1882
Stark, Daniel 36 29 June 1820 23 April 1907
Stark, James Theopolis 7 26 April 1850 16 February 1926
Stark, John Daniel 11 18 September 1845 8 August 1919

=========================================

Joseph Lazarus Mathews came into the valley with Orson
Pratt's advance company July 22, 1847. In 1851 he
accompanied Amasa Lyman and Charles C. Rich to San
Bernardino, California. He remained there until the
settlement was abandoned in 1857 when he returned to
Utah settling his family in Santaquin, Juab county. He
was a farmer and freighter. Mr. Matthews died May 14,
1886 at Pima, Arizona.

=======================================

Matthews, Joseph Lazarus – (Captain of the 14th Ten)
Born Jan. 29, 1809, in Johnston Co., N.C., the son of
Lazarus Matthews and Delia Howard. After his marriage
to Rhoda Carroll, they moved to Neshoba Co., Miss.
After hearing Elder Benjamin Clapp preach, he joined
the Church and in 1845 sold his holdings in Mississippi
and moved to Nauvoo. He entered the Salt Lake Valley
with the advance company of the pioneers. In 1849 he
took part in a company exploring southern Utah. In
1851, he joined Apostle Charles C. Rich in colonizing
what became San Bernardino, Calif., where he remained
until the colony was recalled in 1857. He then settled in
Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah, and from there served in the
Southern States Mission. He worked at farming and
freighting until 1880 when he settled in Pima, Graham
Co., Ariz. He died there May 14, 1886, at age 77.

================================================================

++Links related to Joseph Lazarus Matthews 1809++

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~grahamcem/glenbar.html

https://familysearch.org/patron/v2/TH-301-44943-171-26/dist.pdf?ctx=ArtCtxPublic

http://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/joseph-lazarus-matthews_17665511

http://www.geni.com/people/Joseph-Lazarus-Matthews/6000000010841679424

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=50771024

https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/companies/468/joseph-lazarus-matthews-company

https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/pioneers/428/joseph-lazarus-matthews

http://winterquarters.byu.edu/portals/121/PAF/ward7/pafg05.htm

http://www.ourfamtree.org/browse.php/Ann-Holten-Matthews/p174094

http://www.computerized-ancestor.com/?author=DH1&pagenum=136

http://www.familycentral.net/index/family.cfm?ref1=6024:25&ref2=6024:26

http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Matthews-Descendants-799

http://www.wemightbekin.com/Descendants%20of%20Jacob%20Matthews.pdf

http://www.familypursuit.com/genealogy/matthews_anson/anson-matthews-b.1840-1

http://www.ancestry.ca/genealogy/records/julie-antinett-matthews_17711787?geo_a=r&geo_s=ca&geo_t=ca&geo_v=2.0.0&o_iid=41016&o_lid=41016&o_sch=Web+Property

https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/pioneers/44062/joseph-lazarus-matthews

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ldshistorical&id=I17169

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ldshistorical&id=I53383

http://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/thomas-lazarus-matthews_17677928

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Matthews-789

http://www.ourfamiliesroots.org/pioneers/company/03.htm

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